Health systems: Nutritional interventions to high-risk groups in low-income countries


Start Date: 
January 1, 2007
End Date: 
December 31, 2011
Project Code: 
1207-LIFE
Total grant: 
DKK 9,503,362
Contact : 
Henrik Friis
Email: 
hfr@life.ku.dk
Countries: 
Ethiopia, Tanzania
Description: 

The aim of the project is to improve nutrition and health among vulnerable groups, such as women and children, and patients with HIV and tuberculosis (TB), by developing and testing nutritional interventions that can be provided within the health system. The project comprises studies and capacity-building activities in Tanzania and Ethiopia. In Tanzania, together with Mwanza and Muhimbili Medical Centres, National Institute of Medical Research, we completed two large trials on the effects of micronutrient supplementation and additional energy/protein supplementation among a total of 1250 pulmonary TB patients. In Ethiopia, we have established a strong collaboration with Jimma University, JUUCAN – Jimma University and University of Copenhagen Alliance on Nutrition. A planned trial among pregnant women and infants could not be conducted, but we received permission to complete studies that would otherwise have been part of the trial: This includes a study on utilization and quality of antenatal and delivery care, in which the effect of an improved care package, developed based on a participatory approach, was assessed. Furthermore, a large cohort of healthy children was followed, based on unique data on body composition measured at birth and five times during the first half of infancy, using air displacement plethysmography. Finally, a study on the effect of nutritional rehabilitation of children with severe acute malnutrition is being conducted. Based on the JUUCAN collaboration, and in accordance with the overall objectives of this project, but with additional funding, we are also conducting a large nutrition intervention trial among patients with HIV starting antiretroviral treatment. PhD-training for 1 Tanzanian have been completed, while 1 Ethiopian and 2 Danish PhD-programmes are about to be completed.

Output: 

The aim of the project was to improve nutrition and health among vulnerable groups, such as women and children, and people with HIV and tuberculosis (TB), by developing and testing nutritional interventions that can be provided within the health system.
The project comprised studies and capacity-building in Tanzania and Ethiopia. In Tanzania, with Mwanza and Muhimbili Medical Centres, National Institute of Medical Research, we completed two large trials on the effects of micronutrient and energy/protein supplementation among 1250 TB patients. In Ethiopia, we have established a strong collaboration with Jimma University, JUCAN – Jimma University and University of Copenhagen Alliance on Nutrition. A planned trial among pregnant women and infants could not be conducted, but we received permission to complete studies that would otherwise have been part of the trial: This includes a study on utilization and quality of antenatal and delivery care, in which the effect of an improved care package, developed based on a participatory approach, was assessed. Furthermore, cohorts of healthy pregnant women and children were followed with assessment of physical activity and data on body composition. In infants, unique data on body composition, measured at birth and five times during the first half of infancy, using air displacement plethysmography was collected. Finally, a study on the effect of nutritional rehabilitation of children with severe acute malnutrition was conducted. Based on the JUCAN collaboration, and in accordance with the overall objectives of this project, but with additional funding, we are also conducting a large nutrition intervention trial among patients with HIV starting antiretroviral treatment. PhD-training for 1 Tanzanian and 1 Dane has been completed, while 1 Ethiopian and 1 Dane are about to complete their PhD-training.
 

This page was last modified on 12 October 2012

Other News

Subscribe to RSS headline updates from:
Powered by FeedBurner